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Shout out to my roofers!

 

You nailed it is almost always a positive term.  It means you hit the nail right on the head. No pun intended, i kinda dig puns, for those of you who didn’t know, now you know.

 

As Mike Cody says,  there are times when you nailed it doesn’t always mean something good. Like when your crew leader calls to tell you he put a nail through an air conditioning line. You could say, "He nailed it!"

 

It is always a good idea, before you have your crew begin work, to check out any area of the job that could possibly cause you a problem. Remember, the roofers don’t have X-Ray vision.

They can’t see through the roof decking to see what’s on the underside. So, a quick trip into the attic with a bright flashlight, before roofing, could save you a huge headache.

 

Take the time to check if there's a possibility a roofing nail could penetrate an A/C line lying too tight up against the decking.

There may even be a gas line running up the side of the house from the gas meter on the outside of the house.

 

More than a few roofers have hit a gas line where it crosses the plate into the attic. When you hit a gas line it can shut your whole production down. The gas company has to be called and the gas shut off immediately. Sometimes you even have to have a city permit to get the line repaired. It can cause a major delay for your roofing schedule, not to mention upsetting your homeowner.

 

There are other lines in the attic your roofer may not be able to see, such as water lines, cable lines, security system lines, or even electrical lines.

 

You get the picture; you don't want any of those lines nailed. So, a little bit of prevention can go a long way. Take the time to do a quick look around the outside of the house, and then, thoroughly in the attic.

No matter how hard you try to prevent these kinds of problems, there will always be those few that sneak by. You can’t see what’s lying under the insulation in the attic floor or what may be running along the back side of a framing joist.

You cannot prevent every problem from happening.

 

That’s why somewhere on every contract you should have a disclaimer explaining you will not be responsible for any gas, water, a/c, electrical lines, etc.

Take the time, somewhere in your sales presentation, to explain to your homeowner the possibility of a roofing nail penetrating a line somewhere in their attic because the roofer cannot see it from the outside of the roof.

Explain that it seldom happens, but it could.

Because it doesn’t happen often, you shouldn’t make a big deal of it when explaining it to your customer.

Your homeowner will understand and appreciate you.

 

This Safety reminder is brought to you by Front Range Insurance & Financial Services, Your Colorado Roofing insurance specialists.  

 

 Your safety needs like your insurance needs require FULL TIME PROFESSIONAL ATTENTION

 

Call Leo at 970-330-7240 for help in selecting your Safety, Training, for residential and commercial roofers.

 

 

 

Posted 12:55 PM

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1 Comments

OC Roofing system said...
You never want to be looking anywhere but local for a roofing contractor. I don’t know if they will charge you more, but like you said, they will know the regulations and building codes better. I have never thought about getting a warranty for the roof. I would see if you actually need a warranty because my house for instance is in the desert so we don’t get very violent storms like other places.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15 2019 12:08 PM

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